Laser Assisted In-situ Keratomileusis (LASIK)

Laser Assisted In-situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) is a laser vision correction technique in use since the mid-90s for correction of greater degrees of short and long-sightedness. Using a motorised device called a micro-keratome, an extremely thin flap is created from the cornea. The micro-keratome itself is used as the precision and thickness of the flap that is being created is impossible to achieve by hand. The flap is then folded back, and the excimer laser applied to the underlying corneal tissue. The flap is then returned to its original position over the top of the newly treated cornea. No stitches are required to hold the flap in place as flap adheres back into place within 2-3 minutes. Most patients find that they are able to achieve useful vision 1-2 days after this type of laser eye surgery.


Laser Assisted In-situ Keratomileusis (LASIK)

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