Associate Professor Michael Goggin speaking at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons annual Congress in London


Dr Goggin spoke on his research into improved outcome for cataract patients with astigmatism at a recent meeting of over 8000 ophthalmic surgeons in London.  Astigmatism is a failure of focus of the eye due to the fact that the surfaces that focus the light are oval instead of being spherical.  It is possible to insert a lens in the eye at the time of cataract surgery that corrects for this and about 25% of cataract patients would benefit.  Small amounts of remaining astigmatism are not uncommon with these lenses and Dr Goggin has invented a new method of adjusting the astigmatism correction in these lenses to halve the remaining astigmatism.  The levels of astigmatism achievable are so low as to be invisible to most patients.  This means patients can be less dependent on glasses after surgery.

He has called his method the “Adelaide nomogram” and was invited to present his findings at the Australian Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons at their annual meeting in early August in Port Douglas.  He was also invited to speak on similar topics at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons annual Congress in Amsterdam last year and to act as a panellist at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons annual Congress in Boston in April of this year.

In London and in Boston, he also participated in teaching courses for ophthalmic surgeons interested in improving their astigmatism outcome.


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